Week 3 RESEARCH & SUMMARY 18.06.2020

Week 3 RESEARCH & SUMMARY 18.06.2020

THIS WEEK I ….

SURVEYS/QUESTIONNAIRES

  • I PRODUCED A QUESTIONNAIRE ON SURVEY MONKEY , TO ASK PARENTS WITH CHILDREN IN SCHOOL AND TEACHERS ABOUT THEIR EXPERIENCES OF SCHOOLS BEING CLOSED AND THE MOVE TO EITHER LEARNING FROM HOME, OR TEACHING FROM HOME. I AM GOING TO COLLATE THE INFORMATION NEXT WEEK AS I STILL HAVE NEW ONES COMING THROUGH EVERYDAY. IT IS REALLY VERY INTRIGUING AND TELLING THE THINGS I HAVE BEEN GETTING THROUGH AND I AM REALLY EXCITED BY THIS.

THE REASON FOR THIS RESEARCH WAS TO TRY AND FIND SOME CORRELATION BETWEEN HOW CHILDREN/FAMILIES WERE FINDING THE ‘SCHOOL FROM HOME’ AND FAMILIES REMOVING CHILDREN FROM MAINSTREAM EDUCATION. I’LL PRESENT THE FINDINGS NEXT WEEK, BUT I THINK I HAVEN’T HAD ENOUGH RESPONSES TO DRAW ANY SCIENTIFIC CONCLUSIONS AT ALL, BUT THE ONES I HAVE RECEIVED (AROUND 30 I BELIEVE) DO SHOW COMMON POINTS OF INTEREST BETWEEN PARTICIPANTS.

  •  I HAVE ALSO TAKEN TWO SURVEYS FOR OTHER PEOPLE/BUSINESSES . ONE FROM SOMEONE DOING RESEARCH INTO THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HOME SCHOOLING AND HOME EDUCATION (FROM A HOME EDUCATORS POINT OF VIEW) , AND ONE ON PENGUIN BOOKS ABOUT THE POTENTIALS OF CREATING BOOKS FOR LEARNING, LEARNING ABOUT CORONAVIRUS AND IN GENERAL SUPPORT FROM THE PUBLISHERS AT THIS TIME.

THE REASON FOR ME TAKING THESE SURVERYSWAS IN THE FIRST CASE TO CONTRIBUTE TO SOMEONE ELSE’S RESEARCH WHO WAS COMPLETING AN MA ( IN RESEARCH IN EDUCATION), AND IN THE SECOND CASE TO BE ABLE TO SEE WHAT OTHER SURVEYS WERE BEING CONDUCTED AND WHY AND THE TYPES OF QUESTIONS BEING ASKED. THEY WERE BOTH INFORMATIVE SHOWING ME AS I WISH WHO WAS ASKING QUESTIONS, WHY, AND WHAT THEY HOPED TO DO WITH THAT RESEARCH (I WAS ESSENTIALLY RESEARCHING OTHER PEOPLES RESEARCH METHODS) , IT ALSO GAVE ME IDEAS FOR THINGS TO DO AND NOT DO IN MY OWN RESEARCH MOVING FORWARD.

  • I TOOK PART IN A NATIONWIDE CONSULTATION BEING RUN BY EXAM BOARD OCR IN RESPONSE TO THE CALL TO PRODUCE A GCSE IN NATURAL HISTORY. 

THE REASON I DID THIS WAS TO SHOW HOW THE HOME EDUCATED POPULATION IS OVERLOOKED (WE CANNOT COMPLETE COURSEWORK AS WE AREN’T IN A SCHOOL WITH NO TUTORS TO ACCESS AND SIGN OFF COURSEWORK) AND TO SEE HOW IF AT ALL WE WERE BEING CONSIDERED AS A COMMUNITY (WE WEREN’T) , TO PUT ACROSS MY VIEWS AS TO HOW THEY COULD HELP HOME EDUCATED STUDENTS (NO COURSEWORK, OR AN IGCSE OPTION, OR LIKE SCIENCES THE OPTION TO TAKE AN ADDITIONAL PAPER IN LIEU OF THE COURSEWORK BUT BASED QUESTIONS BASED ON THE COURSEWORK METHODS, RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS.  

NEWSPAPER AND MAGAZINE ARTICLES/JOURNALS/ONLINE ARTICLES AND FORUMS

RESEARCH THIS WEEK HAS CONSISTED OF READING

  • TES MAGAZINE ABOUT THE PROSPECTS OF CANCELLING GCSE’S 

An article written from Islington community college on hat the prospect of not completing exams could look like. There were quite a few comments from students that I have heard in the home ed community many times, to do with exams being fine if you don’t have disabilities or mental health problems, retain information well, and don’t choke up under pressure. Student F said “For the last six weeks, we have seen across the whole of England that we do not need a bit of paper, schools or colleges to validate what we have been learning.” whilst student K says “I think that we should be able to continue to do coursework even after Covid-19 had gone. It gives people more time to think about what they want to write and be able to process their thoughts without any interruption.” This notion of not doing exams, and instead doing coursework I welcome in theory, however, in principle this would have a huge knock on effect for home educators, who generally can’t do gcse’s with coursework as the students don’t have teachers who can mark and grade their work. Instead the rely on IGCSE’s heavily, as like in the sciences, the same material is assessed but purely through an additional exam paper instead that covers practicals/coursework. There were many comments from people who were dyslexic who struggle with writing during exams. It seems that there is much support for the prospect of scrapping exams, however that can only be done if additional measures are put in place for those not in the school system.

  • AN ARTICLE IN HARVARD MAGAZINE CALLING FOR A PRESUMPTIVE BAN ON HOME EDUCATION IN THE USA

Elizabeth Bartholet wrote the now infamous article in the Harvard law review (originally written for the Arizona law review) calling for a presumptive ban on HomeSchooling in the US, she says home education “not only violates children’s right to a “meaningful education”  (Bartholet. 2020) and their right to be protected from potential child abuse, but may keep them from contributing positively to a democratic society.”  (Bartholet. 2020) This article has created much controversy and backlash in the home education community , with many debates being staged online in response to it , most notably the  Cato institutes debate between Kerry McDonalds of whole family learning, and Elizabeth Bartholet. Bartholet goes on to state she believes that laws in the US are too lax, allowing anyone to Home-Educate “That means, effectively, that people can homeschool who’ve never gone to school themselves, who don’t read or write themselves.”  (Bartholet. 2020) Bartholet shows a woeful misguidance of what home education is and how it happens. For some families it does indeed happen following a curriculum sat at the kitchen table, replicating school at home. For the vast majority of people I know however, that scenario couldn’t be further from the truth. When I started on our Home-Education journey I had 9 GCSE’s one of those was at a B , the rest were at C’s. Thats it nothing more between my GCSE’s and my MA , yet I have children who between them have achieved 4 A*’s, 3B’s and 2C’s in GCSE’s so far, with the older one being accepted onto a BA course for this year. Without this MA, my 15 year old and 18 year old sons qualifications and GCSE success far outweighed my own. In Bartholet’s mind that just isn’t possible, she doesn’t understand, can’t comprehend, that parents can learn with and alongside their children, therefore teaching children not only ‘lessons’ but the physical act of learning. Intrinsic over extrinsic motivations, the act of learning is the enjoyable and rewarding part, it is, I believe where Home-Education and mainstream educations differs the most. For myself this quote sums up much of what is wrong with not just Bartholet’s view, but that of most grown adults you encounter “From the beginning of compulsory education in this country, we have thought of the government as having some right to educate children so that they become active, productive participants in the larger society,”  (Bartholet. 2020) I wholeheartedly disagree. My child’s education is not for the benefit of the government, the system or the state. My child’s education is there for his or her own fulfilment and purpose in life, do with as they will. Hopefully they will become productive members of society, caring compassionate people, but that isn’t why we educate. I also dispute the fact that the government has any right to my child.  A child is a human being with free will, not an object to be owned and manoeuvred for ones own gain or prosperity. Barthloett’s piece in Harvard Magazine finishes off by saying “I think it’s always dangerous to put powerful people in charge of the powerless, and to give the powerful ones total authority.” (Bartholet; 2020) and one has to ask the question off of the back of this, is Bartholet talking about Home-Education, or the state education system, for what I know of my part, that is a much much better analogy of the school system than of the modern day reality of Home Education.

 

  • AN ARTICLE ON UNSCHOOLING IN THE CORRESPONDENT

This is a really insightful and easy to read article about parenting, and the problems associated with our modern day efforts ‘to parent’ rather than to be parents. I absolute adored the following quote  ”Relationships between parents and children, the comparison suggested, involve a great deal more than practical tips and idiosyncratic experiences. Yet we’ve relegated discussion of those relationships to the lifestyle sections in newspapers, as if we’re unable to see them for what they are: among the most profound and fundamental relationships any of us will ever be part of.” (Gopnik; 2020) . This notion of us us not being able to see just how important the relationships of family life are, is central to Elinore Carucci’s practice, and I have heard her talk about it over the past few months on many occasions, this seeming inability for the art world to see just how important family life is in amongst the sex, birth and death. They go on to say “Before the twentieth century, “to parent” didn’t exist as a verb. ” ” But in recent years, “parenting” has come to mean something that you might “succeed” at (and so can fail at, too).” (Berger, Caselli 2020) . This final quote sums up a lot of my own thoughts, and indeed from the community I have around me , I know, a lot of peoples thoughts on education, unschooling, child-led learning and this path we follow “Gopnik suggests that parents should act like gardeners rather than carpenters: carpenters have their eye on the finished product (a table, say, or a chair), while gardeners plant seeds and care for them with only a vague, and ever-receding, end in mind. ” This vague, ever receding end in mind, isn’t that what all parenting is ? All education is? You strive for a goal and the goal posts move. If one enters this relationship knowing there is no final destination, suddenly the whole experience shifts. The journey is the thing, not the destination, and all that ‘printed on a keyring’ type life affirmations. On the educational system Gopnik says What’s more, Gopnik argues, this specific kind of learning doesn’t prepare children very well for the world outside school – where questions may have more than one answer, and problems more than one solution. Where no one is going to give you a grade for repeating what your teacher told you.” (Gopnik ; 2020) I have found this is in abundance within alternative education, the principle idea that we do not know what the world may look like in the future. We do not know what skills our children may need. We need to have adults who have learnt how to learn, how to discover things for themselves, how to follow a path, get lost down the rabbit hole and come out the other side again, in short, we need unschoolers. We need self directed learners. We do, I believe, our children a disservice in thinking and acting like this cannot be attain earlier in life, but must be ‘saved’ for higher education.

This article led me to the work of Mark Neville , which it was illustrated by, I have added him to my list of photographers to research this module.

 

This blog post has been doing the rounds in Home-Educating groups for a long time now. Written by a state school teacher within the the U.K system, she strives to make people understand the amount of time that is spent, and in a lot of cases, wasted in the state education system. As she points out, not by any fault of the teachers, or the schools, but because it is the nature of the beast. However, Home-Educators are very often faced with seemingly power mad council workers who feel that you should be sat at a table educating a child between the hours of 9 and 3 ‘because that’s what is done in school’ , except it isn’t. Monkey Mum breaks down where all the hours are lost in the school year by various activities, that although obviously productive, enjoyable, warranted etc , are simply not classed as having ‘educational value’ by some of the councils Elective Home Education departments within the U.K  , at the end of her blog she has broken it down to this final sum “ Averaging that out over the school year, we are now down to just 100 minutes per school day. This is what schools class as full-time and efficient education, as set out by law. Considering that if you home educate, you are in your learning environment every one of the 365 days in the year, this equates to 51 minutes per day. Just 51 minutes of learning per day, would achieve the same length of time spent learning, as a schooled child.” (Monkey mum; 2015)

“It requires us to reorient how we think about learning in general, and how we approach the process with our children – maybe even with ourselves, too.” (Richards; 2020) Discussing how you settle into a rhythm for Home educating when new to it, which is central to my topic this module Richards says “There are four essential points that all those currently experimenting with homeschooling should bear in mind. First, it takes time to find your rhythm. This might sound obvious, but the first (overly ambitious) schedule, or the second (pared-down) one, or even the third that you come up with, is unlikely to be a smooth fit. And you’ll realise this only thanks to all the frustrations, failures and annoyances that you and your kids encounter.” (Richards; 2020) He also makes a very reasoned argument for why it is that schools simply fail the majority of children (fail being a personal view here obviously, as if your aim is for your child to go to a Russels group university and they achieve all A*’s then you could say they’re successful. If however, the aim is for them to be emotionally and mentally happy and fulfilled, yet they ended up on anxiety medications due to the stress of having done exams, then one could definitely, and validly argue that they have been failed) “Many educational systems fall into disrepute because of how poor they are at soliciting, engaging and stimulating student interest. Students are often discouraged from participating in their education.” I know for my own children, this ability to lead their education with their own interests , is what has made our journey so far so successful. Engagement is key, and quite simply, many children are just not engaged in the learning process , they see it as something to survive and get through, rather than something to experience, and enjoy.  ”Your children’s education depends less on which workbook you choose for them than on what you talk about at dinner.” (Richards ; 2020)

“Like one’s country, one’s education is, at its core, an ongoing experiment.” (Richards; 2020) In reference to the ongoing ‘Pandemic Schooling’ Richards has this piece of advice “Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks notes, in his introduction to The Koren Siddur (2009), that ‘Prayer is less about getting what we want than about learning what to want.’ If nothing else, for those who usually entrust their kid’s education to others, a few weeks or months of homeschooling is an opportunity to encourage our students to do something novel, different, unexpected – to learn what we could and should want, for them, and for us.” (Richards ; 2020) “Being stuck at home for a few weeks and months, forced to homeschool, is a daunting prospect – but also a tremendous opportunity to cultivate the virtues of independence and original thinking.Aeon counter – do not remove” (Richards; 2020)

“This is the most chilling aspect of Bartholet’s thought on homeschooling, that she actually believes, “Most children will do all right in public schools.” Is this true? Consider evidence at the high school level: ▪ 56% of high school students are disengaged from schooling (Gallup). ▪ 75% have negative feelings about schooling (Yale). Meanwhile, teen suicides increase by about 20% during the school year, returning to lower levels over summer break and holidays.” (Strong ; 2020) “This seasonal pattern in in teen suicides stops at 18 ” (Strong ; 2020) These are based on U.S statistics so not directly linked to the U.K as such, but one can assume there is likely to be a common theme, if not slightly elevated or elevated . Even feeling the way I do about our educational system, these statistics are shocking. Why are they not more widely discussed, debated, and why are we not trying to correct this? Strong cites some very compelling evidence and data about school trauma for children, and then as adults what we remember as traumas from our childhoods. The evidence is definitely strong that school, is indeed a trauma for many, and to remove the right to Home-Educate for those that are struggling in the system, with mental health issues or struggling with suicide, is nothing short of wilful abuse. As Strong argues “ It is intellectually and morally illegitimate to assume that a child will be “all right” at school.” (Strong ; 2020)

“Much of the growth in homeschooling over the past decade has come from urban, secular families seeking a different, more custom-fit educational environment for their kids.” (McDonald; 2020)My daughter was baffled. I asked her what she thinks my response to the professor should be?”  “Maybe the professor doesn’t really know homeschoolers,” my daughter said. “You should explain to her what it’s really like.” (McDonald; 2020)

In direct relation to my focus this module McDonald states “As the COVID-19 pandemic led to massive school shutdowns this spring, over 50 million US schoolchildren found themselves learning at home. Whether because of ongoing virus fears and concerns about school reopenings with strict social distancing requirements, or because they found learning at home more rewarding than they expected, many parents are seriously considering opting out of conventional schooling—at least in the short-term. A new poll by USA Today/Ipsos found that 60 percent of parents say they will likely choose at-home learning rather than sending their children to school in the fall even if they reopen.” This is, as I am finding here. I certainly don’t think that the UK is looking at 60% of people saying they will consider Home-Education, however I do believe that there is a strong movement of people within the U.K that are considering this an option. Outside of my project, and the Ma, I know personally (as in friends and family not I know someone who knows someone) of 7 families within my inner circle of friends and family ho are considering continuing to Home-Educate after the schools return in September.   “If a parent, educator, or any person is suspected of abusing a child, then that individual should be arrested, charged, and tried. But to single out an entire group for pre-crime surveillance with no evidence of lawbreaking is wrong. Critics might argue that if homeschoolers have nothing to hide, they shouldn’t mind more state intrusion if it could protect children. By this same logic, we should allow periodic police inspections of our homes to protect our neighborhoods and make sure none of us are thieves. If we have nothing to hide, we should allow the government to routinely read our emails and listen to our phone calls. We should be okay with stop-and-frisk. In a free society, we should not be okay with these violations of privacy that expand state power and make us less free and less safe.” (McDonald ; 2020) This previous statement linking directly to the ongoing issues we have in The u.K with the media, and certain members of parliament regularly advocating for imposing home checks and regulations on Home-Educators, on the ‘chance’ of them inflicting abuse on their child(ren). This viewpoint is totally nonsensical , we live in a free country where you are innocent until proven guilty. If the government aren’t allowed to decrypt a WhatsApp message, they certainly shouldn’t be allowed to come and invade my family’s own personal private space whenever they feel the need or desire.

“During Monday’s discussion, Professor Bartholet explained that “some parents can’t be trusted to not abuse and neglect their children,” and that is why “kids are going to be way better off if both parent and state are involved.” (Mcdonald ; 2020) I watched the Cato institute live debate, and I agree with McDonald, that this was one of the most poignant things that Bartholet said that pointed to her real issues, and what she is really pushing for. This isn’t about someone not liking the idea of HomeSchooling, this isn’t about child abuse. This is about someone wanting an authoritarian government that has autonomy over it’s citizens choices and how it exercises those ‘choices’.

“Education will need to change, too. We cannot simply return to the status quo. A third of teachers are actively thinking of leaving the profession within the next five years;” (Sweeney ; 2020) It is hard to believe this article was only written 3 months ago. how quickly the world forgets . Sweet stated “When we go back to school everything will be different – and it must be different. We need to ask ourselves the fundamental question: what is the purpose of education?” Sweeny was right to question the purpose of education, and the way it is delivered. Yet now a mere matter of weeks down the line, the mainstream media is pushing for all children to return to school, with headlines to do with how all children need school to learn and without it they just won’t succeed, indeed they imply they wouldn’t possibly survive in a lot of the recent articles and headlines I have seen. Many of Sweeneys’ points are correct and valid, and I haven’t researched what she has written about since. However, there has definitely been a sway in media representation. At the start of lockdown everyone was talking about how children don’t need schools, home is the best place for nurture, learning through life is underrated and should be embraced. Now the government stance has changed, the rhetoric has shifted to ‘all children need schools’, they are suffering without schools, despite the risks it is imperative that they are back in school.  Fundamentally at it’s core though, this article is spot on, despite the change in the undertones from recent media articles “We cannot continue with a toxic exam system that is based on rote learning and an out-of-date curriculum chosen by whoever happens to be the education secretary, and an exam system that has been responsible for a dramatic rise in child and adolescent mental health illness.” (Sweeney ; 2020)

May I offer a word of advice? Don’t bother. If your kids don’t want them, don’t even try to conduct lessons.

Don’t feel bad. When our family started home-schooling, we read an essay by the home-education organisation Education Otherwise, which spoke of the phenomenon of “de-schooling”. It’s a wholly natural reaction for children who’ve suddenly been released from school to want to abandon all aspects of learning, and – for the first time – to live without targets, assessments, early mornings and schedules.” (Morgan; 2020) This article is a bit nuts:)I have to admit …. “You might as well take advantage of this enforced quantum shift in your child’s education and play to its strengths. Every home-educated person I know (you will recognise us from our ability, at parties, to quote seemingly random bits of knowledge while drinking heavily, because we’re incredibly socially anxious and “not used to being around all these people”)” (Morgan ; 2020) Sometimes you feel Moran has nothing but disdain for the concept of Home-Education and unschooling, and at others you think she has the secret to life in it’s entirety and is a little more than mildly mocking everyone on all sides of the fence whilst she dances atop it “Guys, just stick on the subtitles to Peppa Pig and they’ll soon put two and two together. I’m not even joking. My seventh brother, Jimmy, was basically illiterate until he was 11. Then, finally bored of watching Ghostbusters on repeat, he taught himself to read and write, completed his entire education in five years flat and got a 2:1 at Cambridge.” This is a fantastic bit of writing, actually the whole article is . It is dry and witty, tongue in cheek and a little bit true. She does have some fabulous advice when it comes to kids and socialising that goes with Home Educated children, schooled children and every educational practice inbetween ….  ”Let their impenetrable slang and shrill laughter fill the house, while you pop in some earplugs and finally get on with your work. For they are working too. They are working on “bonding with peers, using humour, over their childhoods being disrupted by something quite terrifying” – possibly the most important lesson a child can learn right now.” (Moran; 2020)

“Our Bitesize Daily package has offered two hours of original broadcast programming for pupils in years 1-10 every single day. By the end of the summer term we will have published nearly 2,000 daily lessons online. All are designed to support pupils, to take a load off parents, and to offer structure and support for teachers coping with new realities. ” “Bitesize Daily has had 5 million visitors online every week since term began on 20 April, more than three times our site’s usual weekly traffic. And BBC Education is driving more young people to sign up for a BBC account than anything else we currently make. Let no one tell you our young people aren’t keen to learn.” “ the BBC has shown that we can play a critical role in the UK’s education infrastructure and I would like to see this continue as an even greater part of the corporation’s contribution to the nation.” I find thus article both intriguing and alarming. IF this was to remain a free to all service then I would wholeheartedly support it. If however it was to become a paid for service , I would not. The possibility of this being exploited to become an opt in registration service would have to be looked at an evacuated certainly, however I do think the potential for this is really positive if rolled out correctly. The BBC Bitesize website is an invaluable resource for both schooled and Home-Educated children alike, especially around exam season. However, I do feel strongly that this should not be monetised .

“Fifty years ago, despite formidable detractors, Harold Wilson and Jennie Lee pushed through the creation of an Open University. Look at the proud success that has been. Now we need to do the same in creating an Open School. Such an institution, even if born of a crisis, could play a major role in raising educational standards for decades to come”

“And schools might start to feel different. The preoccupation with crowd control, behaviour, even exclusion, could become part of history in a move towards individual, personalised timetables.”

“ The Open University could advise on infrastructure. Maybe the BBC should take a lead. This would be an institution and a resource for all time. The Open University astonished the world with the quality of its resources and courses. An Open School would match that achievement. Written by Sir Tim Brighouse was the London commissioner for schools. Bob Moon is emeritus professor of education at The Open University

  • A PIECE IN TEACHTHOUGHT.COM ENTITLED ‘THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PEDAGOGY, ANDRAGOGY, AND HEUTAGOGY” BY TONY HEICK

“now more than ever Self-Directed Learning–or Heutagogy–isn’t just possible, but natural, and almost awkward to not use” (Heick ; 2018)

pedagogy-heutagogy-compared https://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/a-primer-in-heutagogy-and-self-directed-learning/

pedagogy-heutagogy-compared https://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/a-primer-in-heutagogy-and-self-directed-learning/

And the people stayed home.
And they listened, and read books, and rested, and exercised, and made art, and played games, and learned new ways of being, and were still.
And they listened more deeply. Some meditated, some prayed, some danced. Some met their shadows. And the people began to think differently.
And the people healed.
And, in the absence of people living in ignorant, dangerous, and heartless ways, the earth began to heal.
And when the danger passed, and the people joined together again, they grieved their losses, and made new choices, and dreamed new images, and created new ways to live and heal the earth fully, as they had been healed.

 

“I would hate for our temporary-homeschooling friends to somehow think that what their kids are having to do via online Zoom lessons and worksheets is what homeschooling is all about.  So, it seems like a fitting time to make a distinction between “schooling at home” and home education.” (Our Thriving Hive; 2020)

“You see, in school, if you take away the teacher and the high-stakes exams, you pretty much take away the bulk of “learning” since everything hinges on the teacher to ask the questions, give assignments, lead engaging discussions and experiments, and give grades. ” (Our Thriving Hive; 2020)

“A thriving home education, on the other hand, emphasizes the learning process, taps into a child’s natural curiosity, and provides the resources for a child to develop his passions and talents.  In home education, the adult acts more as a coach,  provider of resources, and encourager.  The goal is that children learn how to learn, ask their own questions, dive deeply into subject matter, conduct their own experiences”  (Our Thriving Hive; 2020)

They then posed the question, “If you are a homeschooling family by choice, what is it that sets your family apart from the rest of the homeschoolers in the world today who are simply “doing school” at home?” (O.T.H  04.07.2020) This is the same question that Jo at the university of Exeter who is doing her MA in Education , and has gained interesting results.

 

  • AN ARTICLE ON TES ENTITLED “STATE AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS IN ‘MOVEMENT’ TO SCRAP GCSE’S 

“In a meeting of the group last week, Lord Baker, the former education secretary who helped introduce GCSEs, said he thought the exams had “run their course.” (Lough; 2020) “We have an enormous chance this year, because there’s not going to be any – whatever we do we have to watch very carefully how this operates and try to prove to people that sort of regular assessment is just as good and just as effective – and there’ll be big feudal armies on both sides of that debate,” Lord Baker said.” (Lough ; 2020) “”In order to have an effect, we have to become a movement. We’ve somehow got to try and campaign as a movement to change fundamentally the direction of English education. It’s not just about an exam – the whole focus of EBacc and Progress 8 which is Edwardian, with an Edwardian curriculum, it’s word for word, the exact advice that was given to the board of education in 1904,” he added.” This all begs the question; when will the world wake up and listen . The very man who helped push these exams through now thinks they are not the correct choice. The EXACT same scenario as the man in the U.S who helped introduce standardised testing, changed his minded said that it “was too crude for school ” …..

“”For me, GCSEs – especially now we have children staying in education until age 18, it’s an arbitrary, competitive process at that stage in their education, that means very little in terms of them getting to the next stage. Particularly because the results come out maybe a week before they are due to start college,” she said.” (Leanne Forde-Nassey. Via Lough.2020)

THE REASON FOR ME CONDUCTING THIS RESEARCH WAS TO KEEP UP TO DATE ON CURRENT ISSUES AROUND EDUCATION, SCHOOLING AND ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLING, SO AS TO BETTER INFORM MY OWN WORKING METHODS AND PRACTICE , AND MY BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE ON THE SUBJECT. 

PHOTOGRAPHERS AND ARTISTS

  • THE DAUGHTERS OF EDWARD DARLEY BOIT BY JOHN SINGER SARGENT

“It has been described as “Arguably the most psychologically compelling painting of Sargent’s career”.[3] Though the painting’s unusual composition was noted from its earliest viewings, initially its subject was interpreted simply as that of girls at play, but it has subsequently been viewed in more abstract terms, reflecting Freudian analysis and a greater interest in the ambiguities of adolescence.[4]” (Wikipedia; 2020)

The_Daughters_of_Edward_Darley_Boit,_John_Singer_Sargent,_1882_

Fig 2, The_Daughters_of_Edward_Darley_Boit,_John_Singer_Sargent,_1882_

 

ONLINE DEBATE

I WATCHED AN ONLINE DEBATE HOSTED BY THE CATO INSTITUTE WITH Kerry McDonald , Elizabeth Bartholet,  , and  . Kerry is part of Whole Family Learning, and Elizabeth Batholett is the Harvard law professor who wrote the piece in the Harvard Magazine calling for a presumptive ban on Home education in the states. 

BUSINESS AND PRACTICE RESEARCH AND OPPORTUNITIES

I HAVE ALSO BEEN DOING BUSINESS AND PRACTICE RESEARCH, JOINING ELINOR CARUCCI FOR ANOTHER ONLINE TALK ABOUT HER PRACTICE, WORK SHOW GROWS’ TALK WITH ANNA FOX ON  INSTAGRAM LIVE ABOUT APPLYING FOR FUNDING , WORKSHOW GROWS RESEARCH WORKSHOP, I LOOKED AT THE POTENTIAL OF ENTERING THE NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY ‘HOLD STILL’ EXHIBITION, AND THE LIFE FRAMER JUNE MONTHLY CALL FOR THE SUBJECT ‘YOUTHHOOD’. I LOOKED AT FUNDING AND BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES FROM CULTIVATOR CORNWALL AND FEAST 

 

REFERENCES

Bartholet, Elizabeth. 2020. Homeschooling : Parents rights ABSOLUTISM VS. CHILD RIGHTS TO EDUCATION & PROTECTION Available at https://arizonalawreview.org/pdf/62-1/62arizlrev1.pdf  (Accessed 04.07.2020)

Berger, Alison, Caselli Irene. 2020. The correspondent. Meet the parenting expert who thinks parenting is a terrible invention. Available at https://thecorrespondent.com/514/meet-the-parenting-expert-who-thinks-parenting-is-a-terrible-invention/68044097682-75127c8a (Accessed 04.07.2020)

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 IMAGES

Fig 1, pedagogy-heutagogy-compared Teach thought. https://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/a-primer-in-heutagogy-and-self-directed-learning/

Fig 2, The_Daughters_of_Edward_Darley_Boit,_John_Singer_Sargent,_1882_WIKIPEDIA Available at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Daughters_of_Edward_Darley_Boit (Accessed 04.07.2020)

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